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Teenage girl’s boyish figure is often deceiving to others

De ar Abby: I’m a 14-year-old girl with a problem. Because of my buzzed short hair, slim hips and flat chest, I frequently get mistaken for a boy. It really bothers me because, despite my haircut and body shape, I have a feminine face and I wear women’s clothes and makeup. I’m not too much of a tomboy.

Assistant’s gruff attitude needs to be smoothed out

Dear Abby: How do I deal with an assistant who keeps calling me a “brownnoser”? She did it again yesterday at a staff meeting in front of my boss and another assistant. It was the third time she has said it. She is gruff and rude, and several people have complained to me about her attitude.

Cellphone snoop discovers her boyfriend is cheating

Dear Abby: I have been in a long-distance relationship with “Victor” for several years. Recently I began to suspect he was cheating. What raised my suspicion was that I suddenly couldn’t reach him on the weekends. Usually we would Skype — Sunday night for me, Monday morning for him.

Things people never say in the hospice

Four years of my professional life were spent working in hospice. Director of bereavement and pastoral care. Simply put, four of the best years of my life. Creative, energizing and a daily learning curve. A downer? Absolutely not! Quite the opposite. More hopeful, inspirational, meaningful.

Faces of Faith — What we are celebrating this week

A little boy was sick on Palm Sunday one year and stayed home from church with his mother. His father returned from church holding a palm branch. The little boy was curious and asked, “Why do you have that palm branch, dad?” “Well you see son, when Jesus came into town, everyone waved palm branches to honor him, so we got palm branches at church today.”

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Roy Vataja — Why you don’t see cows in downtown Aberdeen: The Cow Ordinance of 1905

Before there were lumber mills, canneries, or even commercial fishing, the primary industry in what is now Aberdeen was farming. When Sam Benn settled here in 1867, he cleared a pasture, brought in some beef and dairy stock, and supplied butter to Olympia and the sparsely populated Puget Sound region. It would be another 17 years before the arrival of the A.J. West family from Michigan and lumbering began to take hold. The town was platted, streets were laid out and a business section grew along with the population, and cows, descendants of Aberdeen‘s first industry, continued to wander whenever and wherever the mood struck them. By 1905, the free-roaming cow was Aberdeen’s most divisive political issue.

Up the Beach — Spring is here

Spring has sprung. How do I know? About 12 varieties of local pussy willows are displaying catkins, birds are busy nest building, deer are shedding winter coats and the true harbinger of spring—skunk cabbage—is bright yellow in all the soggy spots around the North Beach.