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Lifestyle Columnist

Commercialization puts Santa atop woman’s naughty list

Dear Abby: I have decided that when I have kids I don’t want to do the whole “Santa” thing. I’d rather tell them about the real St. Nicholas and what it means to give rather than to receive. Even though I’m not religious, I’ll tell them about the birth of Jesus (even though he wasn’t born in December), and tell them about the winter solstice.

Justice in Motion — A special guest from O3A

Olympic Area Agency on Aging (often called O3A or OAAA) is a wonderful resource for Grays Harbor, Pacific, Clallam and Jefferson Counties. Their mission is to help seniors and persons with disabilities maintain their dignity, health and independence in their homes, through a comprehensive and coordinated system of home and community-based services.

Daughter refuses to open door to mom’s new beau

Dear Abby: I have been divorced for more than a year and recently started dating a very nice man, “John.” My eldest daughter and her children live with me. I’d like to be able to invite John over to our house, but my daughter doesn’t want “strange men” around her kids, which I understand. I tried suggesting that she meet John before assuming that he is a strange man, but she’s hesitant about meeting him.

Nothing New — Those flaky, feisty Finns of Aberdeen

Historically, one of largest immigrant populations in Aberdeen were those who came from Finland. Until 1917, Finland was a part of Czarist Russia. In the early 1900s, to avoid conscription into the Czar’s army, thousands of young Finns fled to the United States and hundreds of them came to Grays Harbor. The Finns, a clannish people, created two distinct “Finntowns”: One in South Aberdeen west of Boone Street; and the second that ran on each side of the Wishkah River from roughly the Wishkah River Bridge to the North Aberdeen Bridge. While most Finns were industrious, providing much-needed labor and economic benefits to their new hometown, there were those who spent a large amount of their time in the local saloons, creating headaches for the Aberdeen police department. Here are a number of stories published by the Aberdeen Herald covering the antics of dissolute Finns.

Mother stoic about son’s deployment

Dear Abby: Since the moment my oldest son, “Ryan,” enlisted in the U.S. Army, our family has been concerned he would be deployed. Although Ryan graduated from high school near the top of his class and had prepared for university, his plans were thwarted when deployment orders came to face off with ISIS in a combat engineer role. He leaves soon for the Middle East.

Nothing New — Rolling the bones: Gambling in Aberdeen

At the turn of the last century, Aberdeen was considered “wide open” to gambling and, day or night, one could always find a card game or roulette wheel to risk their money on. In 1902, the City Fathers called for a crackdown on gambling in Aberdeen and one of the first to be charged was Ed Dolan (later the “D” in the D &R Theater) of the Grand Saloon on the southeast corner of Heron and F Streets. The Aberdeen Bulletin reported the story on April 1, 1902: THE BREACH BETWEEN THE CITY COUNCIL AND THE GAMBLERS GROWS WIDER EVERYDAY — Yesterday Ed Dolan, proprietor of the Grand saloon, was arraigned before Justice Pearson, on a complaint sworn out by Marshal Graham, charging him with conducting a game of chance, on last Saturday night.