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Lifestyle Columnist

Widow with younger lover is uneasy about their future

Dear Abby: I am a widow who has fallen in love with a wonderful man who is almost 30 years my junior. He proclaims his love for me every day, and I know it’s real. I have been warned by others to be aware of “devious males on the make for comfortably situated widows.” After discussing it with the man, I have determined this is not his motive.

Nothing New — The end of Prohibition on Grays Harbor

From 1916 to 1933, prohibition was the law of the land in Washington State. From fine Canadian whiskey to bathtub gin of questionable origins, bootleggers and rum runners managed to supply tipplers with liquid refreshments. The election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt brought an end to the “Great Experiment” and on Grays Harbor during the first weeks of wetness, the great demand was limited by a lack of supply. Here are some stories on the issue as reported by the Aberdeen Daily World in April, 1933.

How does “bliss” figure into your faith?

Lama Chuck Stanford, Rime Buddhist Center: All beings experience some form of bliss. Even animals experience pleasure and bliss. The problem is that most of the bliss we experience is “conditional” bliss; that is, it is generated in response to some object of pleasure.

Verbal abuse at day care cries out for intervention

Dear Abby: I would like to weigh in on your response to “Day Care Drama in Indiana” (Sept. 1), whose neighbor screams at the children in her day care. I worked for 25 years investigating serious complaints, many involving verbal abuse, against day care providers for my state’s licensing agency. It is critical for this reader to contact Indiana’s licensing agency and make a complaint.

Nothing New — Death on the rails: Logging train fatalities

When the first men came to this corner of the country and began toppling the big timber, they started by tackling the trees nearest the rivers and transported them to the mills using the infinite strength of the rivers. As the forests receded, loggers resorted first to oxen and skid roads, and then to railroads, with tracks extending miles into the back country. All phases of the timber industry carry a certain amount of risk, and logging trains were no exception. What follows are a number of gruesome and truly horrible fatal accidents that took the lives of men who had no idea that they were facing their last day on earth. These stories are not for the fainthearted.