Election Questionnaires: House of Representatives, 19th District


Hugh Fleet REpublican

Hugh Fleet, of South Bend, has spent his career in the communication technology field, working for GTE, Verizon and local school districts. He earned an associate’s degree in electronic engineering from Shoreline Community College and has since received more advanced technical training in his field. Fleet has never held public office.

What relevant experience do you have (this could be in holding public office, managing a business, etc.)?

Is there a specific issue that motivated you to run for the Legislature?

Change is needed. Our government is going in the wrong direction, I recently spoke directly with hundreds of citizens, and this is the most consistent feedback I received. The overburden of government intrusion into our lives is destroying initiative, job creation and producing hopelessness. The burden of government regulations is killing the creation of jobs. The government needs to back off and allow the spirit of the American people to be free. This government needs to be stopped, and reversed. My vision for the future is to reverse directions. I believe the qualified vote to be freedoms best defense!

Crude-by-rail has been a main discussion topic on Grays Harbor and in surrounding communities. How do you feel about the projects? What would you hope to do about citizens’ concerns as a legislator?

While doorbelling in Grays Harbor County people whom I spoke to were also concerned about the safety of oil by rail. I also spoke with a gentleman who retired from the railroad and he shared the same concerns and gave reasons as to why they have these concerns. One of the reasons for their concerns is that they have one person doing what three people used to do. Another concern is that the railroad is putting onto the taxpayer what they, the railroad, should be paying for. This retired railroad employee, when asked if he would help me if elected, he said “You know where I live” He is part of the solution.

What are your opinions on the McCleary Decision? How should the Legislature approach K-12 education funding?

As far as my feelings on the McCleary decision, I believe a lot of money could be saved to help lessen the shortfall in our state education budget, by adjusting the rules of retired administrators. At present they can retire as early as their early 50s and be re-employed at the same pay doing the same job as a contractor a year later. They should not retire and put this extra burden on the state if they wanted to work 10 more years.

Many Special Education students’ parents do sue the school districts if they feel their student is not being adequately educated. There are plenty of lawyers making good money from all of us taxpayers.

Many people on Grays Harbor are still concerned about unemployment levels and job creation. How do you think the Legislature could help stimulate growth of the local economy?

Our district’s high unemployment is a byproduct of an overreaching government with too many regulations which are destructive to job creation and longevity. State legislators have become the lapdogs of the state agencies they want to regulate. Legislators gain favor from the state agencies when they support too many new taxes and regulations, which kills job creation. They should focus on less regulation and more efficiency of the government agencies, not being the dog being wagged by the tail.

During the past two sessions, the Senate was controlled by the mainly Republican Majority Coalition Caucus and the House had a Democratic majority. As a result, a lot of legislation passed in one house wasn’t even considered in the other. If you were appointed majority leader, how would you alleviate this legislative gridlock?

This is a symptom of the problem, which is: Our elected officials are focused on special interest groups, themselves, and being re-elected, not the people who they were elected to serve. I will not seek endorsements from special interest groups. My focus will be on the people who I represent. My vote is not for sale.

James “Jimi” O’Hagen No party preference

James “Jimi” O’Hagen, of Grayland, is a father and a grandfather who lives on a farm he purchased more than 40 years ago. He spent his career working in the natural resources sector.

Is there a specific issue that motivated you to run for the Legislature?

Prevailing or not I am going to use my historical experience to show the people of the 19th District how corrupt, deceitful, dishonest and untrustworthy their government is. I am going to show the people how their high taxes are being spent to take their life, liberty and property to make nobility for a few select individuals. If they allow me to take the corruption and dishonesty out of government it will lower taxes and encourage growth. Utube Jimi O’Hagan for documentaries in this area.

Crude-by-rail has been a main discussion topic on Grays Harbor and in surrounding communities. How do you feel about the projects? What would you hope to do about citizens’ concerns as a legislator?

I was directly involved in the Exxon Valdez litigation. Exxon’s attorneys and CEOs made fortunes on the spill and the victims were victimized. CEOs and attorneys are not economically motivated to prevent ecological disasters. Instead, they are economically motivated to cause ecological disasters. Regardless where the crude by rail goes I will do my best to protect the fish and shellfish industries of the 19th and take all of the profit for attorneys and ceo’s out of all ecological disasters. I will hold them accountable instead of the victims.

What are your opinions on the McCleary Decision? How should the Legislature approach K-12 education funding?

The McCleary decision is the product of several years of the violation of the separation of powers by the judicial branch infiltrating the legislative and executive branches of our governments. This is the root of all of our public corruption, dishonesty, deceit and untrustworthiness. We will stop funding the Commission on Judicial Conduct and spend that money where it needs to be spent, such as K-12. I will lead the Legislature in incarcerating several judges for leading organized crime.

Many people on Grays Harbor are still concerned about unemployment levels and job creation. How do you think the Legislature could help stimulate growth of the local economy?

Restoring equal protections of the laws, equal opportunities, and ending the bankruptcy fraud industry will restore small business growth.

During the past two sessions, the Senate was controlled by the mainly Republican Majority Coalition Caucus and the House had a Democratic majority. As a result, a lot of legislation passed in one house wasn’t even considered in the other. If you were appointed majority leader, how would you alleviate this legislative gridlock?

Instead of more laws we need to take the profit out of public corruption, attorneys profiting from creating civil arguments and civil unrest. Everyone deserves equal protection of the laws and equal opportunities and all we have, is laws and opportunities for the elite. Giving the attorneys therein a chance to decide if they are going to honor our constitutions and removing them for violating their oath of office will require them to be respectful, honest and solve most of our problems.

Brian Blake Democrat

Aberdeen resident Brian Blake has served in the Legislature since 2002. He graduated from Aberdeen High School in 1979, and studied forestry at Grays Harbor College and Washington State University. He earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies from the Evergreen State College. Blake is married to Debra Thomas-Blake and has three stepsons and eight grandchildren.

Is there a specific issue that motivated you to run for the Legislature?

It was preserving public access to public land that first motivated me to run for the Legislature. I now serve as the Chairman of the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee and intend to continue in that role.

Crude-by-rail has been a main discussion topic on Grays Harbor and in surrounding communities. How do you feel about the projects? What would you hope to do about citizens’ concerns as a legislator?

I strongly support our permitting laws and processes and I look forward to getting answers from the SEPA studies currently being conducted. The rail infrastructure serving our communities needs significant investment and I believe that message has been heard by the railroad. The concerns about storage and transport in our estuary and along the coast will also be addressed in the SEPA document and will weigh heavily in my future decisions regarding these projects. I intend to continue listening to all voices in the community and also, where states still have authority to support legislation that reduces risks to our communities and environment.

What are your opinions on the McCleary Decision? How should the Legislature approach K-12 education funding?

Our state has consistently led the nation in SAT scores but we are still leaving many behind. I believe re-prioritizing existing revenue and eliminating tax breaks that are not delivering the benefits that were intended should be considered. I also believe the plan that Rob McKenna offered should be on the table.

Many people on Grays Harbor are still concerned about unemployment levels and job creation. How do you think the Legislature could help stimulate growth of the local economy?

We need to continue to invest in infrastructure in our communities. The new building at Grays Harbor College is a great example and the talk of a Gateway visitors center I believe will help change the perception of tourists coming to our communities.

During the past two sessions, the Senate was controlled by the mainly Republican Majority Coalition Caucus and the House had a Democratic majority. As a result, a lot of legislation passed in one house wasn’t even considered in the other. If you were appointed majority leader, how would you alleviate this legislative gridlock?

I don’t buy the premise of your question. The budgets passed had historic bipartisan support and significant legislation was adopted. The one regret I have is that a supplemental Capital budget was not adopted. I have worked with all four caucuses in my time in the Legislature and if re-elected I intend to continue that cooperative spirit to make this State a better place to live and work.

 

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