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16 questions Hillary Clinton should answer

As her campaign for the presidency kicked off, Hillary Clinton managed to go 27 days without answering a question from the press. On Tuesday, she broke that streak. Here are a few questions reporters might want to ask the next time she decides to give her prospective subjects an opportunity to get unscripted answers from her.

Why run for president if you don’t have a chance?

The 2016 presidential election is attracting an unusually large number of hopefuls. The Republicans will probably field more than a dozen candidates and the Democrats, as many as five. Presently, very few of these supposed contenders have a real chance of becoming president. Republicans Ben Carson, Carly Fiorina and Ted Cruz are long shots. On the Democratic side, that term applies to everyone but Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Hypothetical questions meant to mock on the campaign trail

A few weeks ago, journalist Jorge Ramos of Fusion asked Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., if he would attend the gay wedding of a loved one. Rubio responded, “If it’s somebody in my life that I care for, of course I would.” Rubio went on to say that he doesn’t have to agree with someone on every issue in order to attend their wedding.

Let’s debate the Trans-Pacific Partnership before OKing it

This spring, President Barack Obama and Republican leaders in Congress want to use an outdated process used to pass the North American Free Trade Agreement more than 20 years ago — a rule called “fast track” — to force through trade deals without a real debate or any amendments. And fast track would be used to speed passage of the giant Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, trade deal.

Governor’s carbon bill good for environment and business

In Olympia, people speak of “two Washingtons”: the prosperous cities of Puget Sound, home to numerous globally recognized companies, and the rural communities where job recovery is slower and economic development lags behind national averages. Washington needs bold efforts to spur job growth and innovation across all of our communities.

Paul Noe — Governor’s carbon bill would make mills less competitive

Recent news from coastal Washington and the Olympic Peninsula has provided a glimpse into the future of a paper and wood products industry that plays a critical role in the region’s economy. Investments in local facilities are helping them compete in the new efficient manufacturing, carbon neutral energy economy. The question is whether state policies collectively are going to help or hinder that competitiveness.