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Grays Harbor Birds - Hermit Thrush

The Hermit Thrush is one of three spot-breasted thrushes that makes its home in Grays Harbor, and if you see one of the three in winter, more than likely it is a Hermit Thrush. It is one of the most widely distributed forest-nesting migratory birds in North America and the only forest thrush whose population has remained stable over the past 20 years. Most who know this bird talk about its ethereal song; it can be heard at this web site http://birdweb.org/birdweb/bird/hermit_thrush

Grays Harbor Birds — Long-eared Owl

From time-to-time, I stray from the path of Grays Harbor Birds to show something out of the ordinary, remarkable, or just plain interesting. This qualifies, but the possibility is we may yet see this bird in our neck of the woods. There are changes taking place in the traditional habitats, and there are exciting discoveries being made, drawing large crowds to observe the unusual. Gregg Thompson found and photographed two of these visitors to the west side of the Cascades. Now if we can just convince them to try our woods, I bet they would stay.

Fish & Wildlife Weekender for January

For Washingtonians, the start of the new year is prime time to hunt for ducks and geese, fish for hatchery-reared steelhead and enjoy the annual spectacle of bald eagles, snow geese, elk, big-horn sheep and other wintering wildlife.

Grays Harbor Birds — Black-headed Grosbeak

The Black-headed Grosbeak is a bird of our summers, so it seems only fitting that it should be included in the Grays Harbor birds before it heads south for the winter. I have heard many reports from friends who have these lovely birds at their feeders, but I have yet to entice them to visit mine; maybe they aren’t fond of the beach. At any rate, here is a bit more information about them, and a great photo by Gregg Thompson.

Grays Harbor Birds — American Bittern

I keep promising myself more time spent looking for and at birds and less time spent at the computer, but I am woefully short of that promise to myself. Case in point is I have only seen this bird three times in the 30 plus years I have been a birder, and one of those sightings was inside the fenced enclosure at the La Brea Tar Pits, no more than 100 feet off Wilshire Blvd. in Los Angeles, California! There it was, standing on a bed of reeds, out in plain sight. I knew no one would believe me, so I took a photo of the strange sight. That was the first one, and it made an impression. Here are some facts about this elusive bird.