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Jen Gillies — Supreme Court ruling just one piece of the puzzle

On June 26, 2015, millions of Americans celebrated as the Supreme Court of the United States ruled 5-4 that same-sex marriage is a constitutional right. I walked into work that morning and a student ran up to me, jumping up and down and asked if I was as excited as she was. I was confused until she told me the news; we hugged and cried a little. I had co-workers asking me all day about how excited I must be, as they were telling about how they felt when they heard the news. I saw in my Facebook feed many posts of support of the ruling from friends and family members, as well as twice as many re-posts of pictures and articles throughout the past few days.

Climate change and our air-conditioned lives

Pope Francis has proclaimed climate change a fact, stressing our moral duty to correct it. The pontiff titled his encyclical “Laudato Si,” or “Be Praised,” a phrase taken from “Canticle of the Sun,” composed by the wandering naturalist and pioneering ecologist, St. Francis of Assisi.
 

RedBlueAmerica: Are top American journalists revealing their bias?

George Stephanopoulos — ABC’s chief anchor, chief political correspondent and a “Good Morning America” host — last week admitted he had donated $75,000 to the Clinton Foundation since 2011. The admission raised questions about his ability to cover the presidential campaign fairly, and he apologized. It turned out that PBS journalist Judy Woodruff and other media organizations and figures had also donated.

16 questions Hillary Clinton should answer

As her campaign for the presidency kicked off, Hillary Clinton managed to go 27 days without answering a question from the press. On Tuesday, she broke that streak. Here are a few questions reporters might want to ask the next time she decides to give her prospective subjects an opportunity to get unscripted answers from her.

Why run for president if you don’t have a chance?

The 2016 presidential election is attracting an unusually large number of hopefuls. The Republicans will probably field more than a dozen candidates and the Democrats, as many as five. Presently, very few of these supposed contenders have a real chance of becoming president. Republicans Ben Carson, Carly Fiorina and Ted Cruz are long shots. On the Democratic side, that term applies to everyone but Hillary Rodham Clinton.