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Joggers and Trotters thankful

We wish to thank all those who attended and contributed to our recent fundraiser. Along with donations and desserts from team members, we received donations of gift certificates, baskets, merchandise, the ingredients for the chili feed and potato bar and monetary donations from local Montesano and Grays Harbor businesses and individuals. We also would like to thank the radio stations and newspapers for advertising our event.

Locals again being shut out of environmental plans

In a recent guest column, County Commissioner Frank Gordon was singing the praises of the Washington Coastal Restoration Initiative (WCRI). It was a “warm and fuzzy” letter about saving salmon and creating jobs here in Grays Harbor County. Please don’t get me wrong; I am all for saving and actually increasing the salmon and steelhead runs in Grays Harbor County. And jobs — of course Grays Harbor County needs jobs!

Usurious banks

The state now has a tax crisis because the state Supreme Court has ruled that the state must comply with the constitutional mandate to properly fund our schools. The Legislature is now considering raising the gas tax to meet this crisis. This would unfairly impact the middle class and the poor. It is time to make the wealthy pay their fair share of taxes, so we should reinstate the inheritance tax with proper exemptions. We need this money to properly educate our children and maintain a fairer tax burden.

Drivers don’t keep their distance

In reference to the March 3 Daily World story, ” Aberdeen police stop cars not yielding to pedestrians” — wonderful to see the police protecting the pedestrian. But there’s a problem. Many drivers fail to keep the three-second distance from the car in front.

No endeavor is without risk

Apparently I am in the minority of those whose letters you’ve printed about shipping oil through the port. The majority that I have read seem to have what I refer to as “Doomsday negativism.” They only seem to look at the worst possible outcome no matter how remote it may be. The oil train fires and explosions that have been abundantly referred to are few and far between and the conditions that caused them are not present on the Harbor. The major safety problem that I perceive is the rail and trains that are moving relatively slow. The railroad company has been upgrading its rail system recently and I don’t believe that the company wants to have accidents anymore than we do.

Oil — Make no mistake, it is about climate change

The state Department of Ecology has just released its study on rail safety. As expected, the risk associated with Climate Change is dismissed in a few words, on page 74: “The extent to which the burning of fossil fuels affects climate is well understood by Ecology. This issue is not within the scope of this study, which does not lessen the importance of the concerns.”

Just budget responsibly

Frank Gordon’s guest opinion dated Feb. 24 is self-serving and does not represent the taxpayers and the other county commissioners. He correctly outlined the budget issues and the reckless spending over the years that he was part of.

Looking for a few good candidates

One very positive attribute of the style of government used by most cities in the Harbor, is that everyday citizens can become elected officials. The mayors and city council members are shopkeepers, woodworkers, students and retirees. Those who run for office must assume a responsibility to be informed about the issues. They must also connect with the residents they serve, asking their opinions on proposed developments.

Public schools are a bargain

In response to James Walsh’s Feb. 19 opinion piece — “What’s paramount is a fresh way to look at funding and conducting education” — stating the tuition at Central Washington University is slightly over $9,000, I think he might want to elaborate honestly on his facts.

Gracious Cornells

I would like to extend a big thank you to Making a Difference for Kids in Grays Harbor operated by Joe and Beverly Cornell. They have been very gracious and donated many needed items such as coats, hats, gloves, toys and numerous school supplies to the students at Lincoln Elementary School. As someone stated they are our earth angels.

Difficult time

I need to say a big thank you to a lot of people during my sad and difficult time. First to my neighbors Brent and Diane Whitmire. Then to Aaron Glanz, Russ Fitts, Dave McManus, Jeremy Towery, Rhonda Minks, plus several I didn’t get their names and Mike MacGregor. A big thank you to Rocky Sage, Chanda Hair, JoAnn Sutter, Patrice Timpson, Angi Schreiber and Scott Sage. Thanks also to Dave and Carol Wayman, Stan and Diane Pinnick, Rhonda and Ken Ham, Rob Schreiber and Brett Mackey. Thank you North Beach Girls basketball team for the flowers and Madi and Emily for delivering them. Thanks to all the people that dropped in, brought food and sent cards. A special thanks to North Beach Printing and the North Beach Schools and staff. In the event that I missed someone please know that I appreciate all this community has done for me and Jaen.

Good old boys club?

The purpose of this letter is to indicate that I recently went to a Grays Harbor Port meeting. I was amazed to find out that they were also having the annual meetings of two other legal corporations owned and operated by who? The Grays Harbor Port Commissioners!

Lake was never given to the tribe

In response to the Quinault Tribe owning Lake Quinault, there needs to be more research done by government entities. I have been researching Native American history for almost 30 years and have been nationally recognized for my research. Thanks to the Internet anyone can access documents pertaining to Lake Quinault and the reservation boundaries. Washington State University early map collections will show you the original agreed-upon allotments and survey from 1911.